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It's a New Year!

It's a New Year!

It's time to take stock and decide what kind of life we're going to live in the new year...

If one of your goals is to get a little healthier, we'd like to help you with that.

 

We're running a special promotion in 2015 just for you:

--2 Slices of Toasted German Breakfast Bread

+ Your Choice: 2 containers of real butter, jam or cream cheese (mix and match)

+ A Medium Cup of Coffee for 2.95.

Perfect way to start your days and keeps you going with the goodness of Whole Wheat, Rye, Raisins, Dates, Sesame Seeds, Walnuts, Flax, Bran, Grits, Oats, Barley, Millet and Carob.

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History of Shortbread

National Shortbread Day is celebrated each January 6th.

This classic Scottish dessert was traditionally made from:

  • 1 part white sugar
  • 2 parts butter
  • 3 parts flour

Modern recipes deviate from the three ingredient rule by adding salt and using equal parts of granulated sugar and powdered sugar.  All purpose white (wheat) flour is commonly used, however rice or corn flour can be used to alter the texture.

It is thought shortbread is so named because of its crumbly texture caused by its high fat content, provided by the butter.  “Shortening” the dough with fat produces a “short”  or crumbly texture.

The origination of shortbread began with a medieval biscuit bread, a twice-baked, enriched bread roll dusted with sugar and spices and hardened into a hard, dry, sweetened biscuit called a rusk. Eventually, yeast, from the original rusk recipe, was replaced by butter, as it became more of a staple in Britain and Ireland, and shortbread was born.

Shortbread was prepared often during the 12th century, but the refinement of shortbread is often credited to Mary, Queen of Scots in the 16th century, as her chefs perfected the recipe. She may have named of one of the most famous and most traditional forms of shortbread; petticoat tails was a shortbread cut into individual portions in triangular wedges, first called “petit gautelles” or small cakes, decorated with fork tines and flavored with caraway seeds. 

Shortbread was an expensive treat, and it was typically reserved as a luxury for special occasions such as Christmas, Hogmanay (Scottish New Year’s Eve), and weddings. In the Shetland and Orkney Islands, northeast of mainland Britain, a tradition exists where a decorated shortbread cake, made with caraway seeds and called a "Bride's Bonn", is broken over the head of a bride upon entering her new home.

In the modern world, every imaginable version of shortbread has been created. Here at Rossmoor Pastries, we have several beautifully decorated "shortbread" cookies available at any given time, some sandwiched with delicious jams, with varying seasonal designs, perfect with a cup of Boyd's coffee or an Earl Grey tea. Enjoy!

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On the Second Day of Christmas...

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...My true love gave to me a pretty little gingerbread house decorated with candy canes to celebrate National Candy Cane Day today!

Looking for an activity do to with the kids while they're off from school? Come by the retail store and pick up an undecorated gingerbread house...that'll keep 'em busy for hours, create new memories and keep the holiday spirit going in your home...cheers!

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Merry Christmas!

Tomorrow is the first day of the Twelve Days of Christmas ending on the eve of Epiphany, and it's Christmas Day! Someone, in their infinite wisdom, also made Christmas Day, National Pumpkin Pie Day! Call us early today if you need an amazing pumpkin pie for your celebration tomorrow. You can come by later today and pick it up at the retail store. Our flaky crust and creamy pumpkin-y spiced custard filling make our pumpkin pie one of our favorites and it's only available for a limited time. We are closed tomorrow as we all take some time with our families to celebrate together. We thank you for making our year sweet and we look forward to helping you make your next year even sweeter. Merry Christmas! May your holidays be filled with love, laughter and peace...

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Contest Winner!!!

Happy Christmas Eve!

And now for the drumroll, please…

Congratulations to Brenda Silvertooth of Origami Owl! silvertooth.OrigamiOwl.com

She is the winner of our Business Card Christmas Stocking contest and will be receiving a Buche de Noel! Thank you, Brenda, for coming into the store. Thank you to all of our patrons for being a part of our lives. We know you have many choices when it comes to bakeries, and we appreciate you making ours yours!If you liked us on FB or followed us on Twitter or Instagram, you may have just won a Cookie Platter! Go check…

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It's National Date Nut Bread Day!

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It's National Date Nut Bread Day!

Come by the bakery today for our delicious Date Nut Pound Cake. Not a fan of Date Nut...that's okay, we have Pumpkin, Banana Walnut, Zucchini, Carrot Raisin, Chocolate and Marble, too. They come in loaves or rings...what a great way to start the week. Happy Monday!

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The Perfect Little Gift

We've got a perfect little gift for you to give to virtually anyone on your list:

A Rossmoor Pastries Travel Cup--we scoured tons of suppliers and checked hundreds of samples before choosing this great cup (because it looks good, feels great in your hand and it's so easy to clean!), a bag of Nestle's Hot Cocoa, Mini-Marshmallows and little Gingerbread Men for dipping or just enjoying. The long term benefit for your giftee is that coffee refills at the bakery in a Rossmoor Pastries cup are only 75 cents for life!

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National Chocolate Covered Anything Day

Hurray! It's National Chocolate Covered Anything Day! Come by the bakery for these delightful little chocolate covered strawberries, one of several delectables you'll find covered in chocolate here at Rossmoor Pastries. What's your favorite chocolate covered thing?

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​Spreading more holiday spirit today!

Spreading more holiday spirit today!

Stop by the store and put your business card in the stocking for a chance to win a Rossmoor Pastries Buche de Noel!

Like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram for a chance to win one of three cookie platters! Don't worry, if you've already liked or followed us, you're entered, too! Winners will be chosen at random on December 23, 2014.

Thank you for supporting your local family-owned bakery!

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History of the Bûche de Noël

Every holiday season is full of delicious treats: cookies and milk for Santa, homemade fudge, gingerbread houses, hot cocoa with candy canes, macaroons, fruitcake and figgy pudding not to mention delectable pies like pumpkin, pecan and mincemeat. Another oft-demanded holiday treat that we make every year at Rossmoor Pastries is the Bûche de Noël. 

Bûche de Noël dates back to at least 1615 when the first known recipe appeared in Gervaise Markham’s book, “The English Huswife.” The name bûche de Noël originally referred to the Yule Log, transferring to the dessert only after use of this holiday custom declined. The Yule Log may date back as far as Europe’s Iron Age. Records indicate that even before the medieval era, Celtic Brits and Gaelic Europeans would gather at the end of December to welcome the Winter Solstice, marking the end of the winter season, and celebrate the days getting longer. To welcome the New Year and clear the air of last year’s events, families would burn logs decorated with holly, pine cones, or ivy, keeping the ashes as a good luck charm, particularly as protection from lighting strikes. 

A yule log or bûche de Noël is a traditional dessert, considered a type of sweet roulade, as it is rolled up with fillings, served during the Christmas season, especially in France, Canada, several other francophone countries and former French colonies.

The traditional bûche is made from a genoise or other sponge cake, baked in a large, shallow Swiss roll pan, frosted, rolled to form a cylinder, and frosted again on the outside. The most common recipe is a basic yellow sponge cake, frosted and filled with chocolate buttercream; however, many variations on the traditional recipe exist, including chocolate cake, ganache, espresso or other flavors of frostings and fillings.

Bûches are often served with a portion of one end of the cake cut off and set on top of the cake or protruding from its side to resemble a chopped off branch. Bark-like texture, often done by dragging a fork through the icing, is produced in the buttercream for further realism. Cakes can also be decorated with powdered sugar to resemble snow, tree branches, fresh berries, and mushrooms made of meringue.

Rossmoor Pastries’ bûche de Noël as pictured here is made with chocolate sponge, chocolate buttercream and fanciful decorations. Call us at 562.498.2253 to reserve yours by phone or come by the store to pick one up on the way to your next celebration from 7 AM to 6 PM Monday through Saturday.

Thank you to Stephanie Butler, author of The Delicious History of the Yule Log on history.com, and Wikipedia.com, Yule Log Cake, for the facts used in this article.

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